Please stay off the Salmonberry Trail until it’s safe! Other hikes include:

It’s great news that this historic trail is being built, and that we have two state agencies leading the charge to get this trail fixed up and repaired to the point that it can be safely used. For more information on the changing status of the project watch for my reviews of the STIA meetings.

Currently it is not safe to use!!

It is not safe for people to hike or bike the Salmonberry rail line yet. Recently I heard that a family took a Padoodle out on the Big Baldwin trestle. The dog slipped between two ties and fell 180′ to the valley floor. The remains were not recovered since there was no safe way to descend to the bottom of the canyon.

Help it become a trail first, then use it!

Alternative hikes in the area include the Trail from Reehers Camp to Gales Creek, the Triple C Trail, the Standard Grade Trail (see Roger’s Peak Loop), Bloom Lake, the Four County point Trail and the Banks-Vernonia Trail. All of these trails are described on this website.

Seriously, folks they’re planning to issue trespassing citations to thrill-seekers that ignore the no trespassing signs. If you have to see what’s at the bottom of this scenic canyon try using the road that descends down to the North Fork of the Salmonberry. I will post directions for the North Fork approach very soon. To reach the river, the Beaverslide Road approach is being discouraged because it descends over a tunnel and thus “crosses” the Port of Tillamook Bay railroad right-of-way. Hmmm, not sure whether this will be honored by those traditional 4×4 drivers that have used this access before…, or by determined pedestrians.

I also highly recommend walking the Standard grade road that parallels the Salmonberry, only it’s at 2,500 ft in elevation with some tremendous views. It’s also great to bike (even with a street bike). You can reach it by climbing up the slope to the south of Cochran Pond. Just cross the RR tracks and keep climbing up the hill. One road leads to Bell Camp Road (ignore that one) and the other reaches a gated road – that’s the Standard Grade – follow it to the ridge top and follow it south as far as you want. I’ve ridden my bike all the way to Roger’s peak, but you can get all the way to Cook Creek (near Nehalem Bay) with lots of perseverance.

I will post a detailed description of the Standard Grade trail shortly. It’s one of my favorites. You can also reach it by using Highway 6 and at the summit follow the dirt road that veers off to your right. Follow Storey Burn Road to it’s end – high on a ridge. Go past the gate and when you reach the ridge top about a quarter mile further you’ll see another road coming up the slope on your left – from Cochran Pond.

About Jim

Love to spend time getting lost in the deep forests of the Pacific Northwest with Zoe, my Siberian Husky.
This entry was posted in Coastal Trails, Nehalem Valley Trails, Railroads, Salmonberry Trails, Trails, Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

7 Responses to Please stay off the Salmonberry Trail until it’s safe! Other hikes include:

  1. Dave says:

    Which part has signs or is closed? When did this start?

    • Jim says:

      At this time the entire corridor, which is owned by the Port of Tillamook Bay, is off limits. Those of us that are tracking the progress of this mega-project would like to see only portions of the trail closed, but to get that request to the top of the queue will require more public input at the official STIA meetings.

    • Jim says:

      Technically, all the railroad tracks are owned by the Port of Tillamook Bay. As owners, they have decided to not allow access due to the hazards that the trail presents in its current dilapidated state. Signage is not sufficient, nor does it remain in place for long…. So far only a dog has been lost, but it could just as easily been a child.

      The best way I know how to contribute effectively on this contentious issue is to recommend other access routes that are not as dangerous, or avoid the POTB right-of-way.

    • Jim says:

      Technically, all the railroad tracks are owned by the Port of Tillamook Bay. As owners, they have decided to not allow access due to the hazards that the trail presents in its current dilapidated state. Signage is not sufficient, nor does it remain in place for long…. So far only a dog has been killed, but it could just as easily have been a child.

      The best way I know how to contribute effectively on this contentious issue is to recommend other access routes that are not as dangerous, or avoid the POTB right-of-way.

  2. Bill Bauman says:

    Jim, I just watched your story about the Salmonberry trail. Beautiful area. I,m interested to know more about the logging road trails you used to mountain bike from Saddle Mountain to Seaside. I,m not an ” EXPERT ” mountain biker but this looks like a very easy ( non technical ) ride. Possibly park at Saddle Mtn area, ride to Seaside for lunch then back. I noticed some comments about the area being closed, I would not want to break any laws, just get out for some aerobic exercise and sightseeing. Thank you.

    • Jim says:

      The Ridgerunners’ delight bike/hike is not technically difficult, but it’s a fair distance to ride downhill (13 miles). I do not recommend trying to ascend the trail from Seaside to the Saddle Mountain access road; that would be exhausting and you’d likely cut your losses and drop down to US 26 to be rescued by someone that would be willing to give you a lift back to the Saddle Mtn access road. Besides, I don’t recommend starting at the base of Saddle Mountain. Start instead at the top of the ridge (of Humbug Mtn) that’s about half way along the access road to Saddle Mountain. You’ll know the spot when the road begins to dip and drop down to the Lewis & Clark River (bridge). If you’ve gone that far retrace your steps to the top of the fist ridge and look for the trail through the woods heading west. Also pay close attention to my instructions about intersections along the way. It’s easy to go down the wrong road and end up miles from our intended destination. Also watch for bears in this area; they’re more scared of you that visa versa…

    • Jim says:

      The commercial forests along the coast are not managed/owned by Weyerhaeuser, hence access is possible to traverse them with the usual restrictions: no camping, no fires, etc.

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